A stuffed liver roasted in a caul, from Cod Pal Germ 551, section two

15 You make gesulczte (in this case, spiced) liver thus

Item, if you would make a gesulczte liver of veal, take the liver, chop it small and season it well, and take recent bacon and raisins. Lay it (lacuna – a caul?) in front of you and brush it well with egg yolks. Then take the liver and wrap the net (caul) around it and close it up well with small skewers. Lay it on a griddle and let it roast, and baste (beslah) it half with egg yolks that are red and adorn it with green of parsley, and do not oversalt it, etc.

This recipe has a parallel in section one that is there misplaced, separated from its title.

25 A dish of a stuffed liver

If you would make a stuffed liver of a calf, take the liver and chop it small, and season it well. Then take fresh (hewrigen) bacon and raisins and lay the net (caul) out by itself and brush it well with raisins (deleted) egg yolks. Then take the liver and wrap it up in it and close it with little wooden skewers. Then lay it on a griddle and let it roast. Brush it half with egg yolks that are red and half with green parsley, and do not oversalt it.

The reference to a stuffed (gefulte) or ‘galantined’ (gesulczte) liver make erqually little sense, but the recipe comes out reasonably clearly. It is basically a spicy liver sausage wrapped in caul fat and roasted.

I owe thanks to my friend Libby Cripps for pointing me to the as yet untranslated fifteenth-century culinary recipe collection that is bound with similar works on fabric dyes and on medicine in the Heidelberg Cod Pal Germ 551. It looks, at first glance, unexceptional, but I will try to keep up a flow of recipes and see whether it has anything of particular interest to offer.

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